BCCNSW

Obedience

 

Obedience with your Border Collie

The Brains of the Entire Operation

Obedience is a discipline which tests the ability of dog and handler to work as a team whilst the dog follows set commands. Consider taking Obedience training with your dog to a whole new level! Help your dog realize its full potential by entering Obedience trials and earning competitive obedience titles. Obedience trials demonstrate the usefulness of the dog as a companion to man and showcase dogs that have been trained and conditioned to behave well in the home, in public places, and in the presence of other dogs. Obedience trials are one of many types of ANKC (Australian National Kennel Council) events in which ANKC Registered dogs are eligible compete, and there are trials held all over Australia on many weekend in a calendar year. ANKC Obedience trials allow exhibitors and their dogs to enjoy companionship and competition as they proudly earn Obedience titles.

 

Is my dog able to compete?

To be eligible to compete, a dog must:

  • be individually registered on the Main, Limited or Associate Register with the ANKC
  • be over the age of 12 months
  • bitches in oestrum are not eligible to compete

 

Who's the judge?

The Obedience Trial Judge is the person responsible for assessing and evaluating the performance of dog and handler in the ring. The judge will provide instructions to the handler who must then work with the dog to follow the commands. As the team work together, the judge will award points according to the accuracy, efficiency and responsiveness of the desired action. Points are deducted for incorrect, unresponsive or messy exercises. The trial is divided into different exercises and each is scored separately, and the total combined to give the dog and handler their final score for their performance.

 

What are the different classes and levels of competition?

Obedience trials run a series of progressive classes which increase in difficulty. The classes are:

Community Companion Dog (C.C.D.)

This is the basic level of competition and is not a compulsory section. The exercises are:

• Heel on Lead
• Stand for examination on lead
• Recall
• 1 min Sit Stay
• 2 min Down Stay

Three passes of a minimum 85 points out of a possible 100 points under at least two different judges will qualify the dog for the award Community Companion Dog, which follows after the dog's name and is normally abbreviated to C.C.D.

Novice (C.D.)

Obedience trialling at the Novice level consists of the performance of a number of exercises in a formal ring situation. These exercises are:

• Heel Free
• Stand Free for Examination
• Recall Retrieve on the Flat or Change of Position
• 1 minute Sit Stay
• 3 minute Down Stay

Three passes of a minimum of 170 points out of a possible 200 under at least two different judges will qualify the dog for the award Companion Dog, which follows after the dog's name and is normally abbreviated to C.D.

Open (C.D.X.)

Obedience trialling at the Open level is of a higher standard than Novice, and introduces jumping, and stays in which the handler is out of sight. The formal exercises are:

• Heel Free
• Stand Free for Examination
• Drop on Recall
• Retrieve Dumbbell on Flat
• Retrieve Dumbbell Over High Jump
• Broad Jump or Distance Control
• 3 minute Sit Stay - Handler Out of Sight
• 5 minute Down Stay - Handler Out of Sight

Three passes of a minimum of 170 points out of a possible 200 under at least two different judges will qualify the dog for the award Companion Dog Excellent, which follows after the dog's name and is normally abbreviated to C.D.X.

Utility (U.D.)

Obedience trialling at the Utility level is of the highest standard in Obedience trialling. It introduces scent work, and demands a high level of training and understanding between dog and handler. The formal exercises are:

• Seek Back Lost Article
• Directed Jumping
• Scent Discrimination
• Signal Exercise
• Choice of one of
• Speak on Command
• Food Refusal
• Directed Retrieve
• Group Examination
• 10 minute Down Stay - Handler Out of Sight
• 7 minute Down Stay - Handler Out of Sight

Three passes of a minimum of 170 points out of a possible 200 under at least two different judges will qualify the dog for the award Utility Dog, which follows after the dog's name and is normally abbreviated to U.D.

Utility Dog Excellent (U.D.X.)

The exercises at this level extend on those in the Utility section. The exercises are:

• Seek Back with Decoy
• Positions in Motion
• Scent Discrimination – Judges Scent
• Directed Sendaway and Recall
• Distance Control
• Multiple Retrieve
• Temperament Test

Three passes of a minimum of 170 points out of a possible 200 under at least two different judges will qualify the dog for the award Utility Dog Excellent, which follows after the dog's name and is normally abbreviated to U.D.X.

 

What titles can by dog earn?

Obedience Titles are granted once a dog has qualified and the application has been received and approved by Dogs NSW. The titles granted in Obedience Trials are for each of the respective classes offered. When the dog has been awarded each title, the letters signifying the title is added after the dog's name. Only the highest level Obedience Title is used, so for example if 'Jesse' attains the level of Utility Dog, he/she is known as 'Jesse UD' not 'Jesse CD, CDX, UD.'

There is also a further Obedience Title available: the Obedience Champion. A dog is only eligible to gain this title if it has attained it's Utility Dog title and then proceeds to gain a further five scores of 185 or better in Utility (under at least two different judges), with three of these qualifying scores being for first place. The Obedience Champion title, once approved by Dogs NSW, will then appear before the dog's registered name, for example 'Obed Ch Jesse.'

 

How do I get started?

Local Obedience & Training clubs frequently offer classes for every level of training, from puppy school introductory classes to trialling level. Even if Obedience competition is not your ultimate goal, the relationship that training forms between you and your dog will be very rewarding. Border Collies thrive on attention and praise, and love to be given mentally stimulating tasks, so Obedience is a discipline they excell at! Local clubs can also run "fun matches," where you and your dog can test your skills in the ring. Training and handling your dog is an exceptional and enjoyable experience. While training classes offer the best hands-on way to practice for the ring, watching exhibitors at ANKC sanctioned trials will gain you expertise in the Obedience ring.

The Border Collie Club of NSW conducts two Obedience trials each year.

Visit the Dogs NSW website or contact the office to get in contact with your local club!

 

Tips for the First-Time Trialler

  • Make sure your dog is appropriately registered with the ANKC
    • Be sure your dog is current on all vaccinations
    • Learn from an experienced trainer in order to compete competently and safely
    • Join a local training club
    • Become familiar with the ANKC regulations for Obedience trials – rules are available on the ANKC website
    • Attend some Obedience trials and become familiar with the procedure
    • Don't be afraid to ask questions of the experienced triallers
    • Attend training with your dog and practice!

 

Objects Used in Obedience:

Provided by Handler:

Collars and Leads: Either fixed or slip collars can be used in the obedience ring, but collars that are spiked or give additional head control are forbidden. The lead must have a quick release clip and be of a minimum length of 750mm.

Dumbbell: The dumbbell can be made of either wood or plastic and should be proportionate to the size of the dog.

Gloves: Three predominantly white cotton work gloves of wrist length. These must be approved by the judge.

 

Provided by Club holding the trial:

Jumps: Broad jump, high jump and bar jump. All jumps must be painted white or other light colour, except the bar jump which must be painted black and white in alternate sections.

Prescribed area: This forms a square with 1.5m long sides and should be visible to the dog from the starting point in the ring.

Food: Three different varieties of food for the Food Refusal exercises.

Scent Discrimination Articles: Three sets of articles (five articles of each material, wood, leather and metal). Scent Discrimination articles may be provided by the handler.

Seek Back Article: May be comprised of any type of material but must not be of a conspicuous colour.


Contact Details

 

President:                    Lauren Somers

                                     nahrof@iinet.net.au

Secretary:                    Ann Moy          

                                      secretary@bccnsw.com       

                                      (02) 6337 3393

Treasurer:                    Julia Lawrie    treasurer@bccnsw.com

Publicity Officer:         Patrice Smith   publicity@bccnsw.com

Puppy Sales:               Ann Moy     puppysales@bccnsw.com

BC Rescue:                 Julie Gray  

                                      bcra@bcra.org.au   

                                      or check out www.bcra.org.au

                                      (02) 4267 1757