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BCCNSW Puppy Sales

 

Please read puppy information below.

Selecting a puppy and general information purchasing a puppy

Last updated on 10 Oct 2013

 

The below litters, puppies or mature adults are currently listed with the club...

   
  Sorry - there are no listings with the club at this time. Please check back again later...
   

 

Any questions?

Contact our Puppy Sales Officer at puppysales@bccnsw.com

 

The NSW Border Collie Club does not warrant any of the puppy sales that take place between its members and any purchaser. The purchase of a puppy from a breeder is a private transaction between the seller and the buyer. All members of the NSW Border Collie Club must follow the Code of Ethics of the club in regards to breeding.

NOTICE FOR MEMBERS LISTING PUPPIES: In accordance with the Club's Code of Ethics (Sections B & C), members requesting to use the Club's puppy listing service must provide written evidence of the health status (hips, elbows, DNA results) of the parents for the litter. This service is provided to members free of charge.

 

Selecting a Puppy and General Information

The most important decision to make is whether to select a male or a female Border Collie. This is entirely your choice. However, you will need to consider some of the following points first:-

  • Males are stronger, larger and can be more dominant than females
  • Males shed coat usually once a year. Females shed coat with a season (heat), normally twice a year
  • Females come into season about every six months and a season lasts approximately 3 weeks
A puppy with good temperament should readily come to you. Check the temperament of both parents if possible, but remember the dam can be sometimes protective. Ensure the puppy has been vaccinated, wormed and has commenced heartworm treatment. Generally, Border Collies are easily trained. Some character variances can be attributed to different breed lines.

Markings should be the last thing to be considered for a pet. Even for show, markings should not be put above good conformation. Some breeders and judges like classical markings but this is not required in the Breed Standard. The standard only requires white not to predominate. Ideally, body patches are undesirable.

Socialising the puppies with people and other dogs is important and most breeders ensure this takes place. Socialising should be followed up by the new owner having visitors handle the puppy in your home. Do not take the puppy out on the streets unless it has had its 12 weeks vaccination and at least a week after this. Household obedience training for the puppy from 3 months of age is recommended.

The Border Collie is an extremely active and intelligent dog, it needs to be included in family activities on a regular basis to prevent boredom and for socialisation.

 

Questions to Ask When Buying a Pup

  • Has the puppy been immunised and regularly wormed? Can we have the vaccination certificate?
  • Will you be giving me with the puppy a copy of his current diet and a suggested feeding program?
  • Have the parents been health tested for hereditary diseases? What risk do the pups have of carrying (or having) CL, TNS or CEA, or any other health problems? The breeder should be able to give you a copy of the certificates for the parents.
  • If we have any problems do you mind if we call for some advice?
  • Is the pup registered with Dogs NSW? All registered breeders will have Dogs NSW certificates for all their puppies.
  • Has the pup been microchipped?
  • Where is the puppy used to sleeping and what training has he had?
  • What is the temperament of the pup’s parents? Can we meet them?
  • What are the exercise requirements of a Border Collie?
  • How do I get involved in activities with my Border Collie? How can I get in contact with my local dog training club?
  • How much does it cost to look after a Border Collie properly?

For more information regarding hereditary diseases in Border Collies please consult the relevant pages on this website.

 

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